Finding Answers To Your Questions About Amputation

FAQs

Some of the questions people commonly ask about amputation surgery and living with limb loss are:

How do I prepare for amputation surgery?

Our section on amputation surgery will be a good starting place but recommend visiting the Amputee Coalition website to connect with peer counselors or request the Resources for a New Amputee guide.

How long will it take me to recover from amputation surgery?

Because each person is unique, your personal treatment methods, post-op healing regimen and rehabilitation experience may vary.

What kinds of activities can I do after having amputation surgery?

Depending on your recovery and rehabilitation, your medical team may encourage you to maintain physical activity as you recover from amputation surgery and adjust to living with limb loss. Depending on your physical condition and mobility level, you may be able to participate in a wide range of sports after you recover from your amputation.

Will I need physical therapy or occupational therapy?

You may be prescribed specialized exercises or physical therapy to help you regain your mobility. If you have upper limb loss, you may work with an occupational therapist.

Should I get a prosthetic replacement limb?

While prosthetic limbs can help people navigate the world more easily and reduce wear and tear on your residual limbs, not everyone benefits a prosthetic limb. You can discuss your options with your healthcare provider or a prosthetist. Learn more here.

How will I know what is the right prosthetic limb for me? Are there demo limbs I can try until I find the right one?

You're already on the right track! Research is key in deciding which prosthetic device is right for you. Think about your goals and activity levels and discuss them with your prosthetist. Most manufacturers (including Össur) support product demos.

How do I pay for a prosthetic limb?

Ideally, your insurance will help with the cost of a prosthetic limb. Your prosthetist will work with your insurance like any other healthcare provider to bill for their time, service, and your prosthetic device. However, if you are having trouble getting a prosthetic device paid for, Amputee Coalition has resources to help you navigate other source of funding to help pay for prosthetic devices.